Join One Montgomery for a panel discussion on “Leadership and the Achievement Gap”

UPDATE: Please note our time change! Join us at 6:30pm for a meet-and-greet with refreshments, followed by the meeting itself from 7 to 9pm.

While Montgomery County Public Schools remains one of the nation’s top-ranked school systems, it faces new challenges, such as a growing population, an increasingly diverse student body with varied needs, and a persistent achievement gap across race and socioeconomic levels. These issues are especially significant in our local East County schools, affecting not only student performance but neighborhood stability and economic development.

To stay strong, our schools need strong leaders. But where will that leadership come from?

Join One Montgomery next month at the Silver Spring Civic Building for a community workshop on “Leadership and the Achievement Gap.” We’ll look at the issues facing the school system and have a panel discussion with:

  • Craig Rice, county councilmember and chair of the council’s education committee
  • Sonja Santelises, Education Trust Vice President for K-12 Policy and Practice
  • Dr. Maria Navarro, MCPS Chief Academic Officer

The meeting will be held Thursday, January 22 at the Silver Spring Civic Building, located at One Veterans Place (intersection of Ellsworth Drive and Fenton Street). Doors will open at 6:30pm and the meeting will run from 7 to 9pm. Parking is free if you stay after 8pm. Click here for a printable flyer.

 

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MCPS talks the talk about school equity, but do they walk the walk?

Montgomery County Public Schools prides itself on a commitment to “social justice,” working to ensure that disadvantaged students in the school system have the resources they need. But a new report and mapping tool from the Fordham Institute reveals that MCPS spends less on low-income students than other DC-area school systems.

Per-pupil spending at Springbrook High School. Image from the Fordham Institute EdExcellence mapping tool.

Per-pupil spending at Springbrook High School. Image from the Metro DC School Spending Explorer mapping tool.

MCPS spends an average of $13,613 per student at its high-poverty schools (defined as schools where more than 75% of students are on free or reduced lunch) compared to $13,821 in Fairfax County, $14,497 in DC, and $18,216 in Arlington. When low-poverty schools are compared to high-poverty schools, MCPS spends an average of 32% more per student at its high-poverty schools, compared to 34% in Fairfax and 81% in Arlington.

Researcher (and MCPS parent) Michael Petrilli says these figures speak volumes about the school system’s priorities. “These findings are more than a little embarrassing for Montgomery County, which prides itself on its commitment to “social justice,” and has an explicit policy of sending extra resources to its highest poverty schools. Yet it is bested by Fairfax County (by a little) and Arlington (by a lot),” he writes. “If Superintendent Josh Starr is an “equity warrior,” what does that make the folks across the river?”

Most of the county’s high-poverty students are concentrated at schools in East County. That’s one of the major contributors of school system’s persistent achievement gap between low- and high-income students, as schools tasked with educating students with the greatest needs don’t always have the resources they need. School spending isn’t a direct indicator of a student’s performance, but it determines everything from teacher compensation to the quality and availability of educational materials in the classroom. And if our schools aren’t getting the resources they need, they can’t prepare our students for success later in life.

Getting our students ready for the workforce is the theme of a summit Councilmember Nancy Navarro’s organizing tomorrow in White Oak called Ready for Tomorrow, with speakers including Dr. Starr and Casey Anderson, chair of the Montgomery County Planning Board. The event runs from 9 am to 2 pm at the White Oak Community Recreation Center, located at 1710 April Lane. To sign up or for more information, visit the event’s website.

The strength of our communities and our economy depends on having well-educated students. MCPS talks the talk, but can they walk the walk? That’s one question we hope to get the answer to tomorrow.


Montgomery County schools are segregating, but Starr won’t admit it

A new report says that Montgomery County schools are becoming segregated by income, race, and ethnicity and that “white flight” is occurring in the system’s lowest-performing schools. But officials deny that it’s even happening.

Paint Branch High School in Burtonsville. A new study says that Montgomery County schools are becoming segregated by class and race.

This week, the county’s Office of Legislative Oversight released their findings on the achievement gap in Montgomery County Pubic Schools. Researchers note that low-income, black, and Latino students are still trailing their more affluent, white, and Asian peers, but even more so now that both groups are increasingly concentrated in different parts of the school system.

While MCPS as a whole is a majority-minority school system and has been for over a decade, most low-income, black, and Latino students attend one of 11 high schools, mostly in Silver Spring, Wheaton, and Gaithersburg. Meanwhile, higher-income students, as well as 80% of the school system’s white students and 67% of its Asian students, now cluster at schools on the western side of the county.

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